Monthly Archives: August 2014

Dear PPCD Teacher…

It is still hard for me to fathom the reality that Braxton is going to start school on Monday, but whether I like it or not (or am ready or not!) it’s happening.  I have been working this week to update Braxton’s Care Notebook and writing a new letter to his new PPCD (Preschool program for children with disabilities) teacher.  His Care Notebook has his medical history, information about his feeding, how to feed him, how to administer medication if he needs it, and what to do in case his g-tube comes out or other emergency.  I have also prepared a spare G-tube kit with instructions. (I will write another post later with a little more on these).  I’ve tried to prepare as much as possible for Braxton’s teacher and hopefully we haven’t missed anything! As we did last year, I’m going to share Braxton’s letter with you. If you read the previous letter, you will really see just how far Braxton has come in a year. This little boy is truly amazing!!

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Dear PPCD Teacher,

BraxtonThis handsome little boy is our son Braxton (or Brax as we sometimes like to call him). We are so excited to see him take on this next chapter of his journey and look forward to working with you this year! We’d like to give you a little introduction to Braxton as he begins this school year.

Braxton is 3 years old and currently has a diagnosis of Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS). Don’t feel bad if you don’t know what this is, because it is pretty rare. Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome is characterized by distinct facial features such as a beaked nose, almond-shaped eyes, small head and jaw, broad thumbs, and a smile that causes the eyes to slant and almost completely close. Children with RTS also have a variety of medical issues that can affect the heart, brain, and digestive system. Braxton is followed closely by many specialists and is currently medically stable. We just followed up with all of our specialists this summer and they are all pleased with his progress and have no significant concerns. Children with RTS also have significant developmental delays but do attain all gross motor skills. Fine motor and speech will be Braxton’s biggest challenges.

Regardless of his diagnosis, you will quickly see that Braxton is just like most of his 3 year old peers in so many ways. He loves to be on the move and play with his favorite toys. He is determined and will work hard to get his way. His receptive language skills are growing every day and you will begin to see his understanding after a short time. He understands the word “no,” but like most 3 year olds, he is not happy with being told ‘no’. He will pout, whine, cry, and if he’s feeling especially dramatic, he will throw himself backward. This is also how he tells us he does not like something (be it an activity, doesn’t like that we stopped an activity, or took something away from him.) He can easily be redirected to calm him down. If that does not work, you can pick him up and swing him a little bit and he will start to laugh. Occasionally, he will shake his head to mean ‘no’ in response to a question or activity. He does also understand a few short phrases like “It’s time to eat,” “come here,” “time to go bye-bye,” “all done,” and “let’s read a book.”

Right now, Braxton does not say any words. He communicates with us using non-verbal cues, some gestures, and vocalizations. We communicate with him using Total Communication, which includes talking to him, Sign Language, Picture Cards, and Augmentative Communication Programs. He has not picked up any sign language at this time, but he understands the idea of the picture cards and Augmentative Communication Programs. He will accurately choose a toy or an activity on his iPad when given 4 choices about 75% of the time right now. Picture Cards or AAC opportunities should be given during instructional time as often as possible. Some opportunities might include, during circle time to choose the correct day of the week, to choose a song/activity, during center time to choose a center, or outside to choose which apparatus he would like to play on. We will work with the district Assistive Technology teacher, our speech therapist, and you to find a program that will grow with Braxton to use as his voice as the year progresses.

Braxton is currently working very hard to walk independently and is very close to doing so. He will walk very well with us if we are holding his hand, and often he merely holds on by one finger. He is gaining confidence to walk short distances without assistance and this should be encouraged as much as possible. When walking, you must only hold one of his hands. The moment you hold both of Braxton’s hands, his legs magically turn into wet noodles and he crumbles to the ground. It’s really quite amazing. He crawls really well and likes to “walk” in a tall-kneel position. He is currently using a combination of crawling, kneeling, cruising and walking to get around his environment. With a little bit of work, we really believe Braxton will be walking on his own very soon.

Braxton is a very easy-going and happy little boy. He has a bright smile, an infections laugh, and he radiates so much joy. He LOVES music and lights. And he loves to listen to the different sounds things make when they hit the ground, so he will often pick toys up and drop them. His current favorite game is peek-a-boo. He initiates this game often by covering his eyes with his hands. If you say “Where’s Braxton?” he will uncover his eyes and wait for you to say “Peek-a-boo” and then he will give you the biggest smile and a high-five. He also loves windows and doors, so it would be good to not seat him directly next to a window or door because he will want to stand there. He is also very curious, so if he sees an open door, he is very likely to crawl out. Braxton also needs extra sensory input at times and will chew or hit his head to get that input. We redirect his chewing to something that is appropriate like a chewy tube or his pacifier. He will often chew on a plush toy so that he can focus on an activity in front of him. He does not head bang as often as he used to, but if he does, it should be redirected. He loves big movements like swinging, jumping and spinning. He loves being outside and feeling the breeze as he swings back on forth at the park.

Overall, Braxton is pretty easy to care for and is very interested in learning. With a little bit of time, his personality will begin to shine through and he’s sure to steal your heart. If you want to learn more about him, please feel free to ask us or browse his website at braxtonjoseph.com, where we regularly write about our journey and experiences. We strive to keep open communication with all of our teachers and providers, so please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or issues. And please keep us updated on his progress; there is nothing too small! We are so glad to have you on Team Braxton and look forward to an incredible school year! Thank you for taking the time to read about Braxton and for your dedication to the PPCD program.

 

Thank you,

Vanessa and Joseph

 

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